December 15, 2016
by rcrellin
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Hilltop Hoods’ Interactive Music Video

The Hilltop Hoods have teamed up with Google to make a powerful interactive video for their song Through the Dark, written about a father supporting his son through Leukemia.

The video is made entirely of code and allows users to tilt and rotate their phones to navigate through the “dark” (fear) and “light” (hope) worlds. Users can also interact with the video on a desk top through a trackpad or mouse.

“Using 3D cameras mapped to the phone’s accelerometer, the film uses mobile technology combined with 3D modelling and animation to capture the sense of a world turned upside down”

 

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September 9, 2014
by rcrellin
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iPads for Learning: online professional learning registration

The Department’s Virtual Conference Centre is providing four iPads for Learning short courses for teachers and leaders who are using iPads in their teaching and learipads3ning. Each short course will contain three sessions, with each one hour session building upon the previous session’s learning. Each course focuses on a different aspect of using iPads:

Two courses, iPads for New Users and Publishing with iPads,  are open now for registration. Short Course 1: iPads for new users     Click here to register for this course      Short Course 2: Publishing with iPads  Click here to register for this course

The short courses will be facilitated by Andrew Del Mastro. Andrew is a member of the Apple Consultant’s Network trained to deliver Apple PD (APD). Scroll down to see how to connect.

Short Course 1: iPads for new users     Click here to register for this course     

 Session One: Introduction to the iPad
 Date: Wednesday 8th October 2014
 Time: 3.45 p.m.
 Content: This session will introduce participants to the basics including; how to navigate your iPad, how to organise Apps, how to download content, and how to setup your iPad in the Settings area. Setting up Mail and Calendars will also be demonstrated as with other tips and tricks to ensure you’re on the way to using your iPad effectively.

6184101

polycom

 Session1BACKCHANNEL –http://todaysmeet.com/intro6184101
 Session Two: Ready to Start Creating
 Date: Wednesday 15th October 2014
 Time: 3.45 p.m.
This session will look at creating and storing content including how to manage photos, videos, documents and music. Cloud storage and sharing will also be discussed as well as how to use iCloud to back up your device.

 6184101

polycom

session2

BACKCHANNEL –  http://todaysmeet.com/create6184101

 Session Three: Ready to Start Exploring Content
 Date: Wednesday 29th October 2014
 Time: 3.45 p.m.
This session will explore the rich ecosystem of digital content including how to discover great content including apps, digital teaching resources, online teaching materials and other useful resources.

6184101

polycom

Session 3

BACKCHANNEL –  http://todaysmeet.com/explore6184101

 Short Course 2: Publishing with iPads

Click here to register for this course

Session One: Introduction to iBooks Author
Date: Thursday 16th October 2014
Time: 3.45 p.m.
Content: This session will introduce participants to iBooks Author the most powerful digital publishing tool available. The basics will be covered including how to lay out a book, adding text, video and images as well as saving and sharing your work. The session will also contain an introduction to building interactive widgets.
Required: iBooks Author for Mac
    Blackboard

Participant Connection URL 

Session Two: iBooks Author: The Next Level
Date: Thursday 23rd October 2014
Time: 3.45 p.m.
Content: This session will delve into tips and tricks and how to supply your end user with an immersive interactive experience. From using hidden pop-ups to creating colour pallets and master pages this session will look at the fundamentals of designing a truly interactive book including all of the interactive widgets contained within iBooks Author as well as the website bookry.com. This session will also include information on how to publish you book to the iTunes Book store.
Required: iBooks Author for Mac
Optional: Free account at bookry.com
   Blackboard

Participant Connection URL

Session Three: iBooks Author: Custom Widgets and iTunes U
Date: Thursday 30th October 2014
Time: 3.45 p.m.
Content: This session will focus on the software iAd Producer and Book Widgets. This software allows users to create custom interactive widgets. iAd Producer allows the user to build widgets from scratch without any coding required while Book Widgets offers a large selection of templates to follow. This session will conclude with an introduction to iTunes U and how it could be used to distribute your iBooks and other content.
Required: iBooks Author for Mac
Optional: iAd Producer and Book Widgets
Blackboard

Participant Connection URL

These short courses will contain three sessions, with each one hour session building upon the previous session’s learning. All of the courses will be supported with materials accessible via the Department’s iTunes U campus. Each session will require access to the Virtual Conference Centre tool being used for the session; an iPad with the latest iOS installed and some sessions may require additional resources as indicated.

Andrew has designed ongoing Professional Learning programs for Primary and Secondary Schools looking to integrate technology into their teaching and learning practice. With a focus on using new digital tools to produce engaging communications Andrew facilitates a hands on approach to learning. Andrew has also produced multi-touch books for Disney Australia and the AFL Players association.Resources:

Contact: digital.learning@edumail.vic.gov.au

Download this information as a PDF  iPads_for_Learning_Short_Courses

 

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May 28, 2014
by rcrellin
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Seven ways to use technology with purpose

Lynn Davie sent this blog post to the team for discussion, as I read through I thought it was really interesting and had some good points for schools.  Lynn posed the following questions:

  • Do you agree with the author?
  • What would be on your list?

We would love to hear your thoughts in the comments section.

The following post is from AJJuliani.com – Teach Different

Why are you using technology? Or more importantly, how are you using technology to better the learning in your classroom and/or school? If you are like me, then you’ve had your fair share of technology screw ups. Projects that didn’t make sense (but used the tech you wanted to bring in). Activities that were ruined by a crashing website or some technological problem. And of course you’ve probably dealt with the students, parents, and teachers that want to do things “the old way”.

In order to make sure you are using technology the right way, you must first “start with why”. If your students understand the “why” behind your technology use, then the class will have a purpose and technological glitches and issues can be worked through. If they don’t understand the “why” then any small issue could turn into a major problem.

Here are 7 ways I’ve been using technology for a purpose in my classroom and as a staff developer in my school. I’m sure there are many other ways to use tech with purpose, but these are some of my favorites!

1. To Collaborate in Real Time

Remember when Google Docs broke onto the scene? It was magic. Students writing and sharing in real-time, able to see what the other students are doing and saying, while still working on your own part of the project or activity. Flash forward 7-8 years and now “real-time collaboration” is a must for most online software. This type of technology allow project-based learning to be monitored, documented, and done outside of the school hours.

At my school we have been using Microsoft OneNote (as well as the Google products) to collaborate in real-time. Whether it is staff planning together, students working together, or a combination of both…this technology has so many learning purposes.

2. To Reflect and Share

I used to have my students journal in their marble notebooks. And during certain activities I still do (like Writer’s Bootcamp). However, what’s nice about having students journal online and share “in the cloud” is the ability for their classmates to see what they have to say.

This is why I suggest blogging throughout the year, and not just as a project. Make blogging a part of your student’s life and you’ll be able to see which topics, ideas, projects, and activities really impacted them. Sometimes it may not be what you thought…and sometimes their simple act of sharing will bring the class together in ways you never could have imagined.

3. Better Research

After I finished writing my Master’s thesis on ‘peace education in the 21st century’ I talked with my mom about her writing process in graduate school. It sounded awful… She would have to go to the library, find a resource, read almost the entire resource, make copies of the pages she wanted to use, and literally “cut it out” and “paste it on” her typewritten document.

Technology has made research simple and more time efficient. I’m not talking about typing a question into google, I’m specifically focused on searching journal databases like ERIC through places like Ebscohost. A nice search phrase will turn up hundreds of peer-reviewed results which can be sorted many different ways (such as by date or full-text article). Those articles that you choose can then be automatically scanned for your keywords, read the specific parts you want, and use what is applicable with a simple copy and paste and proper citation already set up and ready to go.

How often do we really teach students how to research in today’s world? Or do we expect them to learn on their own like we did?

4. Write and Re-Write

Using tools such as Google Docs, the new Microsoft Word, or Draft students are able to write and edit on the fly. They can get feedback from peers and teachers…and then choose whether or not to accept that feedback on their writing. Technology has changed the writing process in much the same way it has changed the research process.

The most important part of writing is the revising and editing. Yet, we often take it for granted. Instead let’s use the technology to track what types of changes students have made, and if they are making the same mistakes in their writing over and over again. That way, the “re-writing” process can have a direct impact on how much they improve and change some of their writing habits over time.

5. Make Something (that matters)

This may be my favorite way to use technology with a purpose. Students now have the ability to make movies, songs, pieces of art, websites, apps, games etc–with technology. However, too often we ask students to make something that does not matter. We ask them to make a movie or poster or presentation that has no direct impact on the world around them.

Instead, let’s challenge ourselves to start making technology matter. Make iMovies that can be uploaded to Youtube and have a purpose. Make games with a meaning. Make apps that matter. Yes, there is a time for fun and games. But if that is all we use technology for in school…then we shouldn’t be surprised when that is all students use technology for once they get out of school.

6. Keep a Digital Record

Digital portfolios are a must. Not because colleges will want and need them in the future (which is happening sooner than you think). Not because it is a cool way to show off what you’ve done in class. Digital portfolios are a must because they show learning growth.

The best way to show how much a student has learned is through a digital portfolio. You can look back over time and what they’ve created, written, and done in school. And how that work has improved (and in what ways) throughout their schooling. When students know their work will be on display and recorded, they also take pride in what they do because it will last.

Ask yourself, are you making “digital fridge art” or something worth keeping?

7. Mastery Assessments

Think about the last time you gave an assessment. I’m sure you prepared students for it during class, gave them materials to study, and supported them during the assessment. However, there were definitely a few students who struggled on this assessment. What happens next? You can either give them a re-take, give them another similar assessment, or say that is there only chance.

If you gave them a digital assessment you’d be able to see exactly which questions they got wrong in comparison to the entire class. You could see how much time they spent on the question and if the answer they chose was way off base…or close. You could tailor a new assessment based on just the problems/questions they got wrong and make sure they achieved mastery on those topics before moving forward.

Technology should change the way we do assessments forever, yet sadly many of us still give tests the same way we did 10 years ago. This is a tech purpose we can’t avoid any longer.

Innovative Teaching Challenge #5: Use technology for a purpose. The next time you use it in class make sure you explain the “why” to your students. This is an important step that we often forget to do. Also, we want to hear how you are using tech in your classrooms.

A.J. Juliani

This is the fifth post in the “Innovative Teaching Challenge” series. You can read more about the series here, or learn more about my class story in my upcoming book: Inquiry and Innovation in the Classroom: How 20% TIme, Genius Hour and PBL Drive Student Success (coming on  June 17th).

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April 24, 2014
by rcrellin
0 comments

Using Digital Tools in the Classroom – Online Professional Learning

An online professional learning program related to using a range of digital tools in the classroom has been developed to meet request from schools.

Focus areas will include:

  • Beyond classroom walls – Web conferencing (2 sessions)
  • Social media in teaching and learning (2 sessions)
  • Mobile devices across the curriculum (1 session)

You can choose one or two focus areas or take part in all 5 sessions.

Online sessions will be held on Blackboard Collaborate and will be 45-60 minutes in length.  Each focus area will run for approximately two weeks and will encourage teachers to link in with other professionals to share experience and ideas.

Participants will need to book sessions using the link below before the 20th of May, 2014.

To register for one or all of the courses click here.

For the PDF information sheet to display in your school (similar to below) please click this link – Using Digital Tools in the Classroom

For more information or enquires please contact Penny Rowe on 03 9651 3017 or email rowe.penelope.m@edumail.vic.gov.au

Webinar date/time

Focus Title

Presenter

Target audience

Wednesday, 21th May 2014, 4pm

 and

Wednesday, 28th May 2014, 4pm

Beyond Classroom Walls – Web Conferencing

These sessions will support teachers to use web/video conferencing tools such as  polycom, Lync, Skype and Blackboard collaborate and connect with other teachers outside of your school community.  This course would be very useful to those schools that have recently received a Polycom unit and would like to learn how to use it better.

Register

Anne Mirtschin, Virtual Conference Centre Coach

All school staff

Register

Thursday 5th June 2014, 4pm

 and

Thursday 12th June 2014, 4pm

Using Social Media in Teaching and Learning

These sessions will explore how social media can support and enhance teaching and learning.  This course will help teachers to develop a better understanding around using social media safely with students, exploring some of the concerns and misconceptions.  It will also help teachers who are unfamiliar with social media to learn about how it can be used for tasks such as professional networking and information gathering.

Register

 

Mel Cashin, Digital Learning Consultant

All school staff

Register

Wednesday 18th June 2014, 4pm

Mobile devices across the curriculum

This session will explore using mobile devices, such as iPads, in the classroom in creative ways.  We will consider the value and use of various apps across all curriculum areas including video, animation, recount, storytelling, and augmented reality.  There will be opportunities for discussion around how to overcome barriers such as the transfer of data, connecting, creating a multi-device environment and implications of particular apps.   

Register

 

Penny Rowe Senior Project officer, Digital Learning Branch

All school staff

Register

 

 

 

 

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February 26, 2014
by rcrellin
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iPad Orchestra at Boneo Primary School

Our guest student bloggers this week: Liam, James, Riley, Macoy, Zali, Finn, Seth, Tom , Brigitte, Harry, Stacey, Poppie, Ella, Meg and Samantha.

Thanks to Sally Walsh for pulling it all together.

We have a fabulous school concert band with lots of excellent musicians. Many of our musicians are also very interested in technology, particularly mobile devices. One day our teacher played her iPad by blowing into the microphone using the Ocarina app. Our clarinet and flute teachers played too. It looked like a lot of fun, so- the Boneo PS iPad Orchestra was born! At present we have 20 members in our i-Orchestra. There are lots of music apps for iPad. We already had Garage Band and were looking for instrument apps that matched the instruments we play in our concert band. We researched lots of apps and came up with the following list to use.

Garage Band: Turns your iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch into a collection of Touch Instruments and a full-featured recording studio — so you can make music anywhere you go. Use Multi-Touch gestures to play pianos, organs, guitars, drums, and basses.

Real Piano: A full 88-key piano app that brings you realistic grand piano sound, smoothly moving and zooming, customizable key labels, and professional tuning & transposition functionalities.

Woodwind instrumentSS: A music application packed with 12 different woodwind instruments such as the flute and the clarinet.

Viola: Play Viola on iPhone, options are smooth performance or bowed and pizzicato sound

Ocarina 2 Blow into your phone, play the notes, feel the magic as Ocarina 2 responds to your breath, touch and movement. Turn your phone into an ancient flute-like instrument.

Drum Kit: is the fastest and most realistic drum app in the App Store. It blends in cymbal sounds like a real kit, a feature that isn’t available on any other drum app.

How it works:  Each group plays their own part together – keyboard players, then guitarists, flautists, etc using the apps we chose. Then we try to play two groups together, adding parts until we are all performing together.  When we first started we had problems because we couldn’t hear what other people were playing, but then we bought mini hamburger speakers to each iPad. That solved the problem.

Opportunity to collaborate:

Would you like your class to collaborate with ours for music lessons? Join in the fun at Boneo PS online. All you will need is a data projector or IWB and a computer. Lessons are at different times of the week, covering all primary grades and lots of different activities. No experience in either music or technology necessary!

Contact Sally Walsh:  walsh.sally.j@edumail.vic.gov.au

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November 20, 2013
by rcrellin
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The use of iPads to support students with learning challenges

Guest blogger –  Carly Toister, Cheltenham Primary School

All classrooms have a diversity of student abilities. In this day and age we are well aware that digital learning is evolving at a rapid rate. Our students have ample access to digital devices, so the question is – How can we use this technology to its full potential to assist these students?

The teachers at Cheltenham Primary School have been trialling and exploring ways to use this technology to support, assist and enhance learning for our students experiencing challenges when engaging with the curriculum.

We have been using the iPad in many different capacities with these students. But one particular app that we have found most beneficial for those students experiencing challenges in reading and writing is ‘iReadWrite.’

We have been particularly impressed with iReadWrite and have seen significant improvements to students’ motivation and feelings towards writing. This app has offered a way for students to save time and overcome some of the issues they have previously encountered, such as slow note taking or unreadable handwriting, allowing them to use their time for all the things in which they are gifted e.g. creating, communicating, making connections and expressing themselves.

Some fantastic features of iReadWrite:

  • Great text to speech function. Students are able to get immediate feedback and listen back to their work allowing them to check for meaning and grammatical errors. This fosters independence and reduces reliance on their teacher. It also gives students control over their learning.
  • Word prediction feature – students were able to quickly grasp how to use this feature. The program predicts what a student is typing. They are able to hold down to hear the word, to check that it is the correct one and also double click for a dictionary definition. This supports and enhances vocabulary skills.
  • The ability to configure students’ preference of coloured backgrounds and font size to relieve visual stress.

iReadWrite overview on YouTube

SAMR Model

Our teachers have also been exploring the SAMR model to plan, create and evaluate tasks set for these students (created by Dr Rueben Puentedura). It is a model used to measure the application of technology and its level of use, in order to improve student learning outcomes at any level.  The SAMR model has completely changed the way we have created technology tasks for all students at Cheltenham Primary School. The students who previously felt challenged and at times disengaged from the curriculum, are now creating movies and multimedia books on the iPad, demonstrating their knowledge in ways that have never been possible before. It is evident that students that were challenged academically are now experiencing success and students that were already successful are going places never seen before! They were not hindered by their limitations and are creating work of a higher standard. When, previously these students would have struggled to write just a small paragraph. The SAMR model is a fairly simple idea but one which has really helped us to evaluate where we are at, and what we could be achieving with our students. This model is definitely worth exploring.

The SAMR Model Explained by Ruben R. Puentedura on YouTube

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